Hard Realities



At James Henry Graf's Angelfire Home


American poet Robert Frost called home "the place where, when you have to go there, they have to take you in." When the only place one can call home becomes hell on earth, a person has the right to seek refuge elsewhere. In a world of law and decency, refugees with a valid fear of persecution should find accommodation, preferably in their chosen destination. Governments and agencies should try to help them.

Disgracefully, this is seldom the case, particularly in Europe. Asylum-seekers are probably the single most vulnerable, most victimized, most exploited, most discriminated-against class of persons on this planet. Most of them have lost, or run away from, everything they once owned, everyone they loved. Because their own country has viciously abused them, they seek in other lands a government that will both respect and protect their essential human rights. Any nation that is honorable and free should attach a high priority to helping such desperate souls. Instead, tragically, those fleeing persecution often face arbitrary standards, speciously justified, that strip them of their last shred of hope. I speak from experience, for this is my own story that I tell.

This account is factual. There is much here that others will seek to deny or to rationalize. Those wishing to do so have at their disposal vast powers and resources. I have only the truth of my heart and the ineluctable force of law, which, for my sake and the sake of many helpless others, must, in the end, prevail.